Falcon soaring high in Columbus

By Terri Horvath

 

Gary Sherman built the nest for Falcon Manufacturing LCC Columbus in 2012. Since then, the company has spread its wings to encompass new facets of business and additional locations.

Falcon’s owner and president started his business “by washing return packaging. Our primary business now is assembling and manufacturing auto parts. We purchase parts, perfect the engineering and assemble them.” Some of his clients include Chrysler, Allison Transmission and Columbus-based Cummins. Jeep and Wrangler are two car brands within the Falcon family mentioned by Sherman.

With the addition of new business, the company has expanded beyond Indiana. Each new location was built in close proximity to Falcon’s major customers. In Columbus, Falcon has 500,000 square feet of working space. An 80,000-square-foot facility is located in Rocky Mount, N.C., with another 80,000 square feet in Charleston, S.C. Falcon also has Indiana space in Plainfield and Greenwood, plus facilities in Detroit, Rochester, N.Y., and Monterrey, Mexico.

The company website also lists ports of entry in Tacoma, Washington, Long Beach, California, New York City and Charleston, S.C. Strategically placed, according to the website, these locations allow Falcon to bring in “parts from all over the world, while managing the global logistics, inventory pipeline, storage and assembly of product.” Fulfilling the work orders requires a roster of about 90 full-time Falcon employees with another 200 contract employees.

Sherman said Falcon is a stand-alone entity, but has ties to Phoenix Group also based in Columbus. The association allows Falcon to offer additional benefits to customers. Alone, Falcon handles the engineering and assembly aspects. “From engineered drawings, Falcon can source, prototype, test and assemble a wide range of products to streamline your supply chain,” according to the website.

Current production involves 70 to 80 cars. Partnered with Phoenix, the two companies offer Falcon’s customers a broader range of options in the supply management chain. “Our flexibility, as a company, has allowed our customers the ability to pick and choose program options which best suit their needs, making change and improving productivity.” The remaining prongs of Falcon’s operations include warehousing and inspection and containment services.

Falcon is flying to new heights in 2016 with the addition of three new cars in its assembly lines. Sherman said he preferred not to reveal the names of the new platforms at the time of the interview to protect his clients’ confidentiality. But he did share that he expects Falcon to add 10 to 15 new positions. About half of the new employees will work in Indiana split equally throughout the engineering and assembly processes.